Preview: Web Images Preview in Your Editor

Ulysses 15 is coming! We’re currently in the process of beta testing, smoothing and polishing the new version. In the meantime, we’re giving you a sneak peek at the new features.

Welcome to the image preview preview 😉 This new feature aims to make the work of website owners and bloggers easier, who store their images online and use URLs to reference them in their texts. With the current version, this works well when they export their texts; however, the Ulysses editor so far only displays tags for web images. But this is going to change!

With Ulysses 15, when you type (img) and reference the image with a URL, the app will retrieve a preview to display in the editor. On all your devices! That way, you can have a better overview of referenced images, and it’s easier to write about something the image is meant to illustrate.

What’s also new is that the PDF and DOCX exporters in Ulysses 15 will be able to handle remote images. So, if your images are online, there’s no more need to download and insert them in Ulysses; it is enough to provide a URL.

Preview: A New Way to Search Your Keywords

Ulysses 15 is coming! We’re currently in the process of beta testing, smoothing and polishing the new version. In the meantime, we’re giving you a sneak peek at the new features.

Keywords are great for assigning your texts to certain categories. They’re versatile: Novelists may use them to indicate the progress of a chapter (“First Draft”). Copywriters label the texts they’re currently working on (“In Progress”). Bloggers reproduce their blog categories in keywords, as they’re transferred when publishing from within Ulysses. And so on.

With the new version, keywords will become even more useful. On Mac, we added a new way to search your keywords, making it a lot easier for you to spot sheets tagged with a specific one.

Read …

Preview: Split View Lets You Work With Two Texts Simultaneously

Ulysses 15 is coming! We’re currently in the process of beta testing, smoothing and polishing the new version. In the meantime, we’re giving you a sneak peek at the new features.

Sometimes, when you write, you need to have an eye at two texts at the same time – or at one text, but two times: research on the left, actual writing on the right. Original on the left, translation on the right. There were ways to achieve that with two separate windows, but Ulysses 15 will make it much more comfortable to work this way on your Mac: with a native editor split view!

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Chinese Author Hailong Hao: “If a Thing Is Worth Writing and Only I Can Write About It, Then Putting It Into Words Is My Responsibility”

Hailong Hao is a jack of all trades. He earns a living as a teacher, but also hosts a blog and a podcast. As a translator, he was responsible for the Chinese version of George Orwell’s Animal Farm; as a writer, he recently published his debut novel. In our interview, Hailong talks about his desire to express himself through fictional texts, and the switching of roles between translator and writer.

Please tell us something about you and what you are working on.

My name is Hailong Hao. I am originally from China, but I live in Canberra, Australia’s capital. Canberra is a city planned from scratch and constantly reminds me of Trantor, the capital city in the Galactic Empire series by Isaac Asimov.

Hailong Hao (Chinese: 郝海龙)

Teaching is my bread and butter. I coach students for GRE and SAT (GRE and SAT are admission tests for grad schools/colleges in North America), and I teach logic and rhetoric courses that prepare scholars to study abroad. In China, people know me as a podcaster of BitVoiceFM and KeepCalmPodcast and as the translator of George Orwell’s Animal Farm. I also define myself as a writer. In my spare time, I write poems, lyrics, and, occasionally, reflective essays on technology. Although my current work engagement doesn’t allow me to write full-time, I still manage to find the time. In the future, I’d like to flourish and grow as a writer.

Read …

Ulysses Beta Now Open

Back from the holidays, we’re full of energy and eager to embark on new endeavours. If you want, come join us on the first trip in 2019: Become a beta tester and try the forthcoming new Ulysses features!

We’re working on our next major release, Ulysses 15. Here are some of the new features you may expect.

  • Editor split view (Mac)
  • New keyword filtering (Mac)
  • Remote image preview
  • WordPress 5 support

If you’re up to some bug hunting, join our beta program!

How to Write a Novel With Ulysses, Part II: Research, Editing, and Export

Cover of Matt Gemmell's novel TOLL

Matt Gemmell is a thriller writer from the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. He wrote his recent book, TOLL — which was published less than two weeks ago — using Ulysses. We invited him to share a few details of his writing process and how he uses several of the app’s features to help him. Last week, he covered his project structure, the manuscript’s organization, and the writing process; plus he explained his use of keywords and word count goals. In today’s post, Matt shares how he is going about reference and research related to his novel and treats the subjects of editing and export.

Reference and Research

When I wrote my first novel, I didn’t fully plan it out beforehand, and I ended up having to do an enormous rewrite after the first draft. It was a horrible process, and it dented my confidence (and motivation). I learned my lesson! For the second book, I fully outlined the entire novel before I started working on the first scene, and the writing process was much, much easier because of it. Read …

How to Write a Novel With Ulysses, Part  I: Organization and the Writing Process

Cover of Matt Gemmel’s novel TOLL

A Guest Post by Matt Gemmell

Matt Gemmell is a thriller writer from the city of Edinburgh in Scotland. He wrote his recent book, TOLL — which is out this week — using Ulysses. We invited him to share a few details of his writing process and how he uses several of the app’s features to help him. In this post, he covers his project structure, the manuscript’s organization, and the writing process; plus he explains how he is making use of keywords and word count goals. In a second post, Matt will talk about how he is going about reference and research related to his novel, and treat the subjects of editing and export.

TOLL is the result of two years of work, and is the second book in my KESTREL series. It’s around 100,000 words long, and required a great deal of planning, research, and organisation. I used various tools for the planning stages, but ultimately I moved almost everything into Ulysses, to keep all my book-related material in one place and easy to access.

Here’s how I went about it. Read …

Novelist Jeanine Krock: “Writing Is a Lonely Job, so You Need to Be Comfortable in Your Own Company”

Jeanine Krock
Jeanine Krock

Sometimes, life takes unexpected turns. It was a severe riding accident that forced Jeanine Krock to change careers. That was fifteen years ago; today, Jeanine makes her livelihood as a novelist. She has published numerous books with various publishing houses and acts as a coach to aspiring writers of all ages.

A German version of this interview is available on the website Die Wortfinderinnen.

Please tell us something about you and what you are working on.

My name is Jeanine Krock. I’m a novelist. Most of what I write I publish under my name, but there are times when I’m using a pen name. Right now, for example, I’m writing as Kiri Johansson, and have just completed the first draft of a novel called Islandsommer (“A Summer in Iceland”), to be published by Heyne in May next year. It’s now with the editors, which, for me, is always a bit of an emotional roller coaster.

I trained as a costume designer, but have also worked as a scout and booker at a model agency, as a relocation consultant, waitress, cook, and in a call centre. At one point, I even ironed shirts for a living. Oh, and I’m a committed European.

Read …

Writer’s Fall Collection

Only for a Short Time: Ulysses T-Shirts!

Forget about long sleeve tops and hoodies; T-shirts are the new hot! Hiplength, short-sleeved, made from cotton or cotton blend, and garnished with a chest print created by designer Philip Ackermann, the new Ulysses shirts are must-haves for fashionable writers of all sexes.

Both T-shirts Ulysses Glyph and DNA are now available for pre-order with Cotton Bureau.

We were lucky to catch busy Philip at his desk, and asked him a couple of questions. Read …