Ulysses 16: Ghost Publishing, iPad Split View

We have just released Ulysses 16 to both the App Store and the Mac App Store. Go grab the update, as it features a couple of fixes and improvements, as well as the option to publish your texts to Ghost.

For a full list of changes, please check the version history.

And speaking of changes, Ulysses 16 introduces something rather special to iPad: Split View aka Second Editor, and it’s so powerful and versatile, I’ll use the rest of this post for nothing else.

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Ulysses 15 Released Today; Split View Ramblings

We have just released Ulysses 15 to the App Store and Mac App Store. Go grab it, if you haven’t already; there really is no reason to miss out.

Ulysses 15 features a couple of noticeable enhancements for images, search, and keywords. It also improves usability on several fronts and fixes a variety of bugs. If you‘re curious, you can read up the latest additions in our version history.

What I want to focus on today, is one particular new feature, which we are introducing to the macOS version: “Second Editor”, aka split view. It’s a good example of how we’re thinking with regards to new features, how our emphasis on design affects release schedules, and why sometimes stuff takes longer than anticipated. It also shows how much work actually goes into a seemingly simple feature, even one which, by default, is hidden from view (no pun).

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5 Out of More Than 100: Ulysses 12.2 Now Available

We have just released Ulysses 12.2 on both the App Store and Mac App Store. The update ships with well over 100 improvements and bug fixes, mostly ironing out smaller annoyances, or slightly tuning existing features.

Most of you probably won’t notice a thing – because you never experienced any of the problems we have solved, or you never use the features we improved, or because the change is so minimal, that you just wouldn’t notice.

As we nevertheless spent a huge amount of time on all these tiny fixes, I’d like to take the opportunity and give you a small behind-the-scenes-look: I’ll walk you through five of the recent changes, which small subset of users they effected, and what it took us to actually fix each issue in order to improve Ulysses for this particular group of users.

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iPhone X, Revised Object Editors, and a New Theme

We released Ulysses 12.1 for iOS today. It should already be available on the App Store, so go grab it, it’s one hell of an update.

The headline feature may be full support for iPhone X, and yes, we love how it looks on Apple’s latest, but we had already done the main part with v12, so let’s not spend too much time on that.

It’s ready for iPhone X, Face ID and all, so go play with it and have fun (the device rocks hard, we know, so go, go, go)!

But…

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Out Now: Image Previews, Drag and Drop, iOS 11

So today we have released Ulysses 12. And as is good tradition around the house, I’d like to talk a little about what’s new and improved. And since this release is mostly about changes to Ulysses on iOS, I’ll start with a cross-platform addition, so Mac-only users can go home early…

Editor Image Previews

One of the most requested features among our users has always been the ability to view images within the editor. I don’t want to bore you with the specifics of why it took us so long, because it doesn’t matter anymore — it’s finally here.

By default, images that reside in their own paragraph, will be rendered as black & white thumbnails, while images that exist within text passages, will continue to be rendered as our beloved IMG-bubble.

Why black & white? And why just thumbnails? To keep you in the text. During development, we found that normalizing all previews will increase text immersion, while still providing enough context. This is especially true for colorful themes in the editor, which tend to easily clash with full color images and thus require users to tinker with formats etc. — something we wanted to avoid in the first place. We are aware, of course, that our approach won’t fit all uses (diagrams come to mind), so consider this a first step, and we’re gladly awaiting your feedback.

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Coming up: New Library, Multi Pane Editing, iOS 11 Drag & Drop

Yesterday, Apple released iOS 11. Needless to say, we’re hard at work bringing Ulysses to Apple’s latest and greatest, but we’re not quite ready yet. So I’d like to tell you a bit about what you can expect. Release? Soon.

As you may know, iOS 11 has a strong focus on iPad — from revised Multitasking to Drag and Drop, it’s all about the big screen. Since we had to change quite a few things anyway (large table headers, spring-loading groups, yay), we took the opportunity and updated Ulysses’ interface in various places.

The first thing you may notice is how several buttons are gone or have traded places. We’re now much more compliant with how iOS handles things, which is a good thing, even if it takes some getting used to, if you’re a veteran user.

Most of these changes were a long time coming (e.g. “Edit” on top), while others were logical results of adopting iOS 11 (three-pane editing on iPad Pro). But we’re also introducing several deliberate changes and fixes to make working with Ulysses even more streamlined and, ultimately, more productive.

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Ulysses Switches to Subscription

We have just released a new version of Ulysses. With it comes a switch to a subscription model, which unlocks Ulysses on all devices. As an existing user, you are eligible for a lifetime discount, and, if you have just recently purchased Ulysses, we are offering free-use periods to compensate for your previous investment.

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Ulysses 2.8 – Touch ID, Group Statistics, and the Return of Clarus the Dogcow

Touch ID

Hey there, friends. Ulysses 2.8 is upon you, and I’d once again like to take this opportunity to shed some light on what’s new, and why we thought the changes and additions were great ideas.

Touch ID

The most prominent new feature is Touch ID and Password Lock. It’s also the easiest to explain and rectify – locking was requested roughly a gazillion times, and seeing how Ulysses has moved to mobile devices, and how these device are oftentimes shared among family and friends, privacy is a major concern, and little if anything is more private than your writing (check your photos, though).

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